Thanksgiving is a quintessential American holiday, but it is also celebrated in other parts of the world. Let's see where.

Canada

Ok, you probably know that already. In Canada, Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday in October.

Canada

Canada’s Thanksgiving traditions are similar to those in the US, including most Thanksgiving food staples, with some variations.

South Korea

Literally “autumn eve”, the Korean Harvest Festival is also known as Korean Thanksgiving Day and it’s similar to the Americans’ custom of coming together to celebrate with the family.

South Korea

On this special occasion the menu usually includes special food that is not eaten daily, and much of the work falls to the first son’s wife

Germany

Erntedankfest: Translated as “Thanks for the harvest festival”, this fest usually takes place on the first Sunday in October.

Germany

Germans are well known for their love for beer and sausages, but that's not what German food is all about.

China

Zhōng Qiū Jié - Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival is also known as the Moon Festival and it’s been celebrated since the early Tang dynasty with an 800 calorie cake.

China

Moon cakes are offered to friends and eaten at family gatherings as their round shape symbolizes reunion.

Japan

Kinrō Kansha means Labor Thanksgiving Day and is the modern name for an ancient celebration of the harvest of the Five Cereals.

Japan

On this day, the Japanese take a day off work to rest or shop. They have a small potluck with Noribachi fish, rice, seaweed salad, and tea.

Japan

On this day, the Japanese take a day off work to rest or shop. They have a small potluck with Noribachi fish, rice, seaweed salad, and tea.