Tatarák (Steak Tartare)

0 0
Tatarák (Steak Tartare)

Share it on your social network:

Or you can just copy and share this url

Ingredients

Adjust Servings:
8 ounces sirloin steak
1 egg yolk
1 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp Salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 tbsp chives finely chopped
2 tbsp red onions finely diced
1 tbsp Olive Oil
3 cloves of garlic
Features:
  • 30 min
  • Serves 4
  • Medium

Ingredients

Directions

Share

Even though not originally from Czechia, tatarák (or steak tartare) ranks very high when it comes to popularity among locals.

This rather strange Czech food is basically raw beef (minced) served in a burger shape with some raw egg on top and a variety of mix-ins. You can either mix all the ingredients (salt, pepper, diced onion, garlic, paprika, ketchup, and mustard) in yourself or order a pre-mixed and ready-to-eat steak tartare. Tatarák is always served with fried bread and you are supposed to treat it as a spread.

Preparation:

  1. Grind the meat or chop it finely with a knife.
  2. Shape it into a patty and put it in the center of a plate.
  3. Make a small indent in the patty and place the egg yolk in it.
  4. Add the cumin, salt, and pepper, and then the chopped onions and chives. Drizzle over some olive oil and mix everything together.
  5. If you wish, add finely chopped sundried tomatoes, capers, and a few drops of Tabasco to add some spice. After mixing everything together, spoon the mixture into a mold and tip it out onto a plate.
  6. Serve the steak tartare with dark rye bread that’s been lightly fried in olive oil and rubbed with garlic.

Chef's Pencil Staff

Our editorial team is responsible for the research, creation, and publishing of in-house studies, original reports and articles on food trends, industry news and guides.

Recipe Reviews

There are no reviews for this recipe yet, use a form below to write your review
previous
Bramboráky (Czech Potato Pancakes)
next
Curry Sausage in Western Germany: A Real Classic
previous
Bramboráky (Czech Potato Pancakes)
next
Curry Sausage in Western Germany: A Real Classic